Women's Hair Health

Hair Where blog

Hirsutism is the appearance of male-pattern hair growth in women due to a variety of factors, but is often traced to the presence of elevated male hormones called androgens; it can also be hereditary.[1]  Many sufferers of hirsutism have been diagnosed with PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) or other hormonal conditions. While a difficult and sometimes embarrassing topic to discuss, hirsutism is a real and often emotionally draining condition, affecting the sufferer’s self-esteem and hair health.

In cases of hirsutism, excessive hair growth occurs on the face, chest and back—all of the places where men usually grow hair.[2] This hair can be coarse and unsightly, but it can also be very painful for women whose thinner skin often results in ingrown hairs, infected hair follicles and scarring from attempts to remove it.

Coincidentally, the hormonal conditions that cause hirsutism can also lead to thinning hair and male pattern baldness in women. This is exhibited in thinned hairlines and other areas of the scalp. Many women find relief from these symptoms through medicine and lifestyle changes, and there are also many natural options for those who suffer from hormonal imbalances leading to hair loss or unwanted hair growth.

Ingredients in the Curl V Hair Vitality Complex have been known to help combat the appearance of unwanted hair on the face as well as thinning hair. Vitamins such as Inositol (part of the B Vitamin family) and Folic Acid have been shown to reduce the symptoms of PCOS in some women and help regain hair fullness.

The inclusion of Inositol in the Curl V Hair Vitality Complex contributes to this formula’s holistic approach to hair health and vitality. At Curl V, we understand that healthy hair comes from a healthy body, and the ingredients in Curl V Hair Vitality Complex are designed to address the varying factors that affect hair health.*

For more information on hirsutism visit:

The Mayo Clinic website

The US National Library of Medicine

 

[1] Mayo Clinic, Diseases and Conditions: Hirsutism. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hirsutism/basics/definition/con-20028919. Accessed May 11, 2015.

[2]  Mayo Clinic, Diseases and Conditions: Hirsutism. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hirsutism/basics/definition/con-20028919. Accessed May 11, 2015.